Overseeing Coast Trader Dive via Satellite

Home|NOAA, Shipwreck Discoveries, Technology|Overseeing Coast Trader Dive via Satellite
Built in 1920, the Coast Trader is pictured in San Francisco in 1937; it became the second merchant ship to be sunk off the continental coast when a Japanese submarine, I-26, torpedoed it between B.C. and Washington. Researchers now say the ship is in Canadian waters. [San Francisco Maritime Research Center] Source: Vancouver Maritime Museum, San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park. [PNG Merlin Archive] / PNG

Built in 1920, the Coast Trader is pictured in San Francisco in 1937; it became the second merchant ship to be sunk off the continental coast when a Japanese submarine, I-26, torpedoed it between B.C. and Washington. Researchers now say the ship is in Canadian waters. [San Francisco Maritime Research Center] Source: Vancouver Maritime Museum, San Francisco Maritime National Historic Park. [PNG Merlin Archive] / PNG

Coast Trader Dive is currently in motion! June 2  | 11 am PDT

Follow the live feed… http://www.nautiluslive.org/

Researchers examine Second World War wreck found in B.C. waters

by Jeff Lee  |  June 1  |  THE VANCOUVER SUN

On June 2, underwater archaeologists and a team organized by Titanic’s discoverer Robert Ballard will begin a 12-hour live-feed dive with a robotic submersible on the presumed resting place of the Coast Trader. The dive, being done from Ballard’s Nautilus, the centrepiece of his Ocean Exploration Trust, is being overseen from a remote command site at the University of Rhode Island by James Delgado, the director of maritime heritage for the  U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the former executive director of the Vancouver Maritime Museum. Duncan MacLeod, curator of the Vancouver Maritime Museum, is also at the command centre. Read the full story… http://www.nautiluslive.org/

By | 2016-12-05T22:22:26+00:00 June 2, 2016|NOAA, Shipwreck Discoveries, Technology|